Tag Archives: Julius Shulman

A. Quincy Jones Brody House photograph by Julius Shulman

The Brody House, designed by A. Quincy Jones circa 1950, exemplifies sophisticated modernism; a modernism void of the common economic limitations post-war architects faced when building commissioned houses. LAMA is representing material from the A. Quincy Jones and Elaine K. Sewell Jones Estate in the May 23, 2010 Modern Art & Design auction.  A lot offering of eight Julius Shulman vintage photographs of A. Quincy Jones buildings contains one photograph of the Sidney and Frances Brody Residence, which is stamped ” Photography by Julius Shulman, 1316-2″. This vintage silver gelatin photograph features a great room with many Billy Haines designed furnishings. This is a fantastic opportunity to own a Julius Shulman vintage photograph of an important modernist house.

A. Quincy Jones Brody House photograph by Julius Shulman, To be offered in LAMA May 23, 2010 Modern Art & Design Auction

Julius Shulman vintage photographs lot information:

Lot 114

Julius Shulman

A. Quincy Jones buildings(8)

Printed circa 1950s-60s

Vintage Silver Gelatin prints

Each retains “Photography by Julius Shulman” ink

stamp and inventory numbers

Comprised of images of St. Matthews Church,

Sidney Brody Residence, Sascha Brastoff Factory &

Showroom (4) and Klein Norton & Co building (2)

Each 8.5” x 11.5”

$2,000-3,000

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A. Quincy Jones and Fredrick Emmons: AIA Firm of the Year Award 1969 and ‘Builders’ Homes for Better Living’

A. Quincy Jones and Fredrick E. Emmons collaborated on numerous architectural projects from 1951 till Emmons’ death in 1974. Jones and Emmons worked together to produce thousands of Eichler homes, and received commissions for churches, universities, manufacturing plants, and libraries. They worked with new materials, were very aware of site design, and focused attention on the building user. They took advantage of the pre-fabricated industrial parts and materials of the time and fused the idea of custom-designed and retailer-designed homes, making homes both affordable and livable for post-war middle class Americans.  Jones and Emmons also worked together with John L. Chapman to produce a book titled ‘Builders’ Homes for Better Living’ (Reinhold Publishing), which explored the assumption that basic architectural elements were important to the builder and to the buyer . LAMA is offering for purchase a copy of this book from the A. Quincy Jones and Elaine Sewell Jones collection in the upcoming May 23, 2010 Auction, as well as the structure built to award A. Quincy Jones and Fredrick E. Emmons for their outstanding architectural achievements as the Firm of the Year in 1969. The structure archives important collaborative projects between Jones and Emmons, and showcases photographs shot by Julius Shulman of each of these projects.

Literature: From the pages of the Eichler Network newsletter by Cory Buckner

For further information or inquiries regarding these important architectural pieces, please email elizabeth@lamodern.com directly.

A. Quincy Jones and Fredrick E. Emmons AIA Firm of the Year Award 1969, To be offered in LAMA May 23, 2010 Modern Art & Design Auction

Builders' Homes for Better Living by A. Quincy Jones, Fredrick E. Emmons and John L. Chapman, To be offered in LAMA May 23, 2010 Modern Art & Design Auction

Chapter 1 from Builders' Homes for Better Living by A. Quincy Jones, Fredrick E. Emmons and John L. Chapman, To be offered in LAMA May 23, 2010 Modern Art & Design Auction

A. Quincy Jones, Sascha Brastoff Ceramics Factory built 1953

Lately we have been very focused on the material from the A. Quincy Jones collection, and today a LAMA Blog reader brought even more A. Quincy Jones information to our attention. After scouring the internet for a basic background on the Brastoff Ceramics Factory, I completely forgot about A. Quincy Jones’ personal portfolio of his projects that was compiled in his office in the early 1970s. Lo and behold I found detailed information on the Brastoff Ceramics Factory, in addition to Julius Shulman photographs of the exterior and interior of the building.

In 1953 A. Quincy Jones and Frederick E. Emmons, Jones’ partner in several projects, constructed the Sascha Brastoff Ceramics Factory, which was located on 11520 West Olympic Boulevard in Los Angeles. Unfortunately the building was torn down in the 1981. In the A. Quincy Jones portfolio the description of the building states, “The architects developed a portion of the manufacturing facility to serve as a continuing demonstration of the work that went on in production.” In addition special stairs and a viewing pad were installed for visitors to watch ceramic production. Also, exposed pipes and ducts were painted in colors to define function and bring a light feeling to those who visited the factory.

Plans and illustrations of the factory were featured in Arts & Architecture Magazine July 1953.  The building was also featured in Progressive Architecture in 1954. An original copy of the July 1953 Arts & Architecture was also in the A. Quincy Jones collection, so I took a photograph of the article for further reference.

Here are Julius Shulman photographs of the Brastoff Cermaics Factory from the A. Quincy Jones collection that will be offered in the upcoming Spring 2010 LAMA Auction.

Exterior of Brastoff Factory, Reprodution of Julius Shulman Print

Original Article of the Brastoff Ceramics Factory in the Arts & Architecture July 1953 Issue

Ceramic Production in the Sascha Brastoff Factory, Julius Shulman Photograph

Brastoff Factory, Julius Shulman Photograph

Interior Gallery Brastoff Factory, Julius Shulman Photograph

Julius Shulman Stamp

Items from the Julius Shulman Estate

We are extremely honored to represent several items from the Julius Shulman Estate. Including several rare ceramic works by Beatrice Wood and Gertrud & Otto Natzler. Shulman was close friends with both and was neighbors of the Natzler’s for many decades.

For today’s pick, I am featuring a welded metal sculpture by Bernard (Tony) Rosenthal.  Known for his landmark public art sculptures in New York, Rosenthal’s early career began in Los Angeles. Charles and Ray Eames, whom he met at Crankbrook, encouraged Rosenthal to move to Los Angeles in the 1940’s, where he developed a strong clientele of architects and designers, many of which featured his works in their interiors and exteriors. Shulman first encountered Rosenthal’s work while photographing the interiors of these new buildings sprouting up around Los Angeles in the 40’s and 50’s. This particular example employs Rosenthal’s abstract expressionist style, which he honed while in Los Angeles. This sculpture was in Julius Shulman’s living room in his house in Los Angeles.

Lot 99, Bernard (Tony) Rosenthal, Sculpture, executed circa 1948, $6,000 - 9,000

Detail, Lot 99, Bernard (Tony) Rosenthal, Sculpture

Lot 99, Bernard (Tony) Rosenthal, Signature